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RI Archives: Food

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Recipe: Egg In A Cornhole Muffin

This is a recipe I used to make at the bakery/coffee shop I was baking for in Brooklyn just before my husband and I left to move up to the beautiful northwest corner. I tried it a couple of times in the bakery once we took over, but I think it was a little too wacky for us back then — we were still transitioning from old owners, and I don’t think it quite fit in with what we’re doing. Now I bake corn muffins every morning and people absolutely love them, and I’ve been toying with the idea of trying this out again — it’s such a great all-in-one breakfast, and people are always wowed by the concept the first time they see them. This is a different cornbread recipe than the one I make every day — it’s a little thicker so that it will hold its own against the boiled eggs.  —Audrey Leary, Blackberry River Baking Co.

Egg in a Cornhole Muffins
Makes 6-8 large muffins

2 cups flour
2 cups cornmeal (I prefer to use a stone-ground one for some texture, but anything will work.)
1 1/3 cups sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda
2 cups sour cream
1 cup browned butter (I put butter in a cake pan and stick it in a pre-heating oven, then pull it out once it’s browned and fragrant.)
4 eggs
6-8 boiled eggs (I like to aim for soft boiled so the yolk is still a little runny, but cook to your preference), cooled and peeled
paprika, mustard powder, grated cheese and sea salt flakes (optional, to garnish)

1. In a large bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients. Separately, mix together sour cream, browned butter and eggs — if the butter is still hot, mix it with the sour cream first so that the eggs don’t scramble when you whisk them in. Fold the wet ingredients into the dry, stopping as soon as combined.

2. Get some jumbo muffin cups and a jumbo cupcake tin, or alternately (as we do at the bakery) some small pannetone molds. Drop a heaping spoonful of the corn batter in, about 1/3 of the way up the cup, and then place a hard-boiled egg on top, right in the middle. It helps if the egg has been toweled off so that it’s very dry on the outside. Take another heaping spoonful of the cornbread batter and place it on top, using your fingers to push it down the sides of the egg and carefully covering the top of the egg. Repeat, then top all of the muffins with your choice of garnish (I use mustard powder and paprika for a little spice and color, grated Parmesan for a cheesy crunch and salt because, you know, salt.)

Bake at 375 degrees for 15-20 minutes, until the muffins have risen, browned and feel firm to the touch. Cut them in half while still hot and enjoy! I served these with sriracha butter. They’re also great for the next couple of days, grilled and buttered, and make an awesome breakfast on-the-go.

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 08/22/16 at 04:30 PM • Permalink

Recipe: Summer Herb Tabbouleh

One of our favorite events every summer is The Sylvia Center’s Farm-to-Table dinner, hosted by Great Performances in the fields of Katchkie Farm in Kinderhook, N.Y. The mission of The Sylvia Center is to inspire young people and their families to eat well through hands-on learning experiences on the farm and in the kitchen. Julie Cerny, farm education director and garden manager at The Sylvia Center, offers us recipes the teenagers are learning to make.

It has been hot. We’re all feeling it. Tabbouleh is a great recipe for hot days, requiring only minimal time near the stove while also employing the cooling effects of cucumbers and parsley. Add in some diced red onion to build on the bite of the green onions if you want more of a kick. Or, if you want to toss in more herbs, we suggest purple basil; both the flavor and color are complimentary.

Summer Herb Tabbouleh
Serves 4 to 6

2 cups bulgur wheat
4 cups water
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tbs. lemon juice
1½ tbs. honey
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
¼ cup chives chopped
3 green onions, thinly sliced
¼ cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
¼ cup diced fresh tomatoes
¼ cup diced cucumbers

1. Add 2 cups bulgur to 4 cups cold water. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer for 12—15 minutes or until tender. Drain off excess liquid. Makes 4 to 5 cups cooked bulgur.

2. In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, honey and ½ tsp. salt until the honey and salt dissolve. Whisk in the olive oil. Add minced garlic.

3. Pour the oil mixture over the bulgur. Add the tomatoes, cucumbers, chives, green onions and parsley, and toss well. Season with pepper, then taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, and serve.

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Posted by Lisa Green on 08/16/16 at 10:08 AM • Permalink

Recipe: Spicy Scallop Ceviche

Customers often ask me what I like to bake at home, and the answer, truthfully, is nothing; I love to bake, but I certainly get my fill at the bakery (and it’s so much more enjoyable when there’s someone else to do your dishes!). I do, however, love to cook, and cook dinner for my husband and myself nearly every night.

This is more of an appetizer than an entree, but served with a salad or another side it makes a great dinner, and it’s perfect for these dog days of summer. It’s bright tasting and cool, and there’s no need to turn on your oven. Scallops can be subbed out for shrimp or ahi tuna if you prefer. —Audrey Leary, Blackberry River Baking Co.

Spicy Scallop Ceviche

3/4 lb fresh bay scallops
1 peach
1 jalepeño
1 red onion
1 cup cherry tomatoes
1 avocado
1 lime
Salt to taste
Tortilla or plantain chips, for serving

Dice all fruit and veggies into small cubes; reserve the lime. (Scrape the cherry tomatoes of their seeds and juice, as much as possible.)

Place them in a bowl and cut the lime in half and squeeze all its juice over the diced veggies.

Cut the scallops into small cubes and add to the mixture; mix well, ensuring that the scallops are covered with lime juice. Add salt and cover; refrigerate for at least two hours. The scallops will go from being a kind of translucent beige to a very opaque white when ready. Serve with chips.

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Posted by Lisa Green on 08/08/16 at 06:02 PM • Permalink

Recipe: Summer Squash And Scallion Quesadillas

One of our favorite events every summer is The Sylvia Center’s Farm-to-Table dinner, hosted by Great Performances in the fields of Katchkie Farm in Kinderhook, N.Y. The mission of The Sylvia Center is to inspire young people and their families to eat well through hands-on learning experiences on the farm and in the kitchen. Julie Cerny, farm education director and garden manager at The Sylvia Center, offers us recipes the teenagers are learning to make.

I like keeping some tortillas in the house – it means I’m never far away from a quesadilla. In July and August, when you’re swimming in summer squash, this recipe is an excellent outlet. Take advantage of grilling season by slicing the squash long and about ¼” thick, rubbing a little olive oil, salt and pepper on it, and carefully firing it on the grill until a few spots start to blacken. If you love that grilled vegetable flavor as much as I do, you’ll want to grill the scallions too. After grilling, go ahead and cut the veggies into quesadilla appropriate sizes.

If you can get your hands on some garlic chives (a very easy to grow and delicious perennial, by the way), add them to your mix of chopped herbs. Make a couple of extra quesadillas to throw in the fridge for your next snack attack. They reheat very nicely in a toaster oven or a cast-iron skillet.

Summer Squash And Scallion Quesadillas
Makes four 9” quesadillas

2 medium summer squash, julienned or grated
1 medium scallion, julienned
1 cup grated sharp cheddar
¼ cup basil, oregano, chives chopped
½ cup arugula
(8) 9” flour tortillas
Extra virgin olive oil

1. Heat a large non-stick skillet to medium-high and add a drizzle of oil. Add scallion and cook for 2 minutes, or until translucent. Add summer squash and arugula and cook for an additional 5 minutes, or until just tender. Remove from pan and set aside.

2. Heat another large non-stick skillet to medium heat and add a drizzle of oil. Place one flour tortilla into pan and sprinkle with ¼ cup of cheese, ¼ of the onion and squash mixture, and a sprinkle of the chopped herbs. Place another flour tortilla on top. When the bottom tortilla is crispy and golden brown and the cheese has melted, use a spatula to flip the quesadilla over. Cook until this side is also golden brown and crispy.

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 07/31/16 at 11:48 AM • Permalink

Recipe: Savory Scones

These are something I make occasionally on weekends, as inspiration strikes; they are a fun way to make a favorite dish into a portable, handheld form. I’ve made red flannel hash, green eggs and ham, bacon and cheddar, and biscuits and gravy versions of these scones, and they are all delicious! They are definitely best warm from the oven, but they’ll keep in an airtight container at room temperature for a day or two — just pop them in a warm oven for a few minutes and they’ll be as good as new. —Audrey Leary, Blackberry River Baking Co.

Savory Scones
Yields 9 scones

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup plus 2 T bread flour
1 T baking powder
1 T sugar
1 1/2 t salt
2 oz. butter, cut into cubes and chilled
1 cup fillings of your choice — chopped, cooked veggies; cheese; cooked meats; etc.
Enough cream to bring it together as a dough (approximately two cups, depending on the fillings you use)
1 egg, beaten with salt
Cream
Salt and pepper (or whatever you care to top them with)

Dump the flours, powder, sugar and salt into the bowl of a food processor; pulse, then add the butter and pulse until the chunks are pea-sized throughout the mixture. Transfer to a big mixing bowl, then add the fillings and use your hands to coat them all in the dough. Add cream, and gently mix with your hands just until it comes together as a biscuity dough.

Dust a bit of flour on your work surface, and dump the dough out; pat it into a large square, about an inch high, and cut it into 9 pieces. Place on a sheet pan, brush with the egg/cream mixture and top with salt and pepper, an herb, a small veggie, or whatever you care to. (Hint: I try to use an item in the scone to help identify it.)

Bake at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes or so, until golden brown and a tester inserted comes out clean. Cool for a few minutes and enjoy!

Have fun with the fillings. Just pay attention to the dough, and be careful not to add too much butter or cream. If I use a lot of bacon, for example, and use the rendered fat in the scones, I cut back on the butter.

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Posted by Lisa Green on 07/23/16 at 01:58 PM • Permalink

Recipe: Vegetable Fried Rice

One of our favorite events every summer is The Sylvia Center’s Farm-to-Table dinner, hosted by Great Performances in the fields of Katchkie Farm in Kinderhook, N.Y. The mission of The Sylvia Center is to inspire young people and their families to eat well through hands-on learning experiences on the farm and in the kitchen. Julie Cerny, farm education director and garden manager at The Sylvia Center, offers us recipes the teenagers are learning to make.

Every season is the perfect season for Vegetable Fried Rice. It’s a great way to “upcycle” miscellaneous types, as well as odd portions, of veggies. And it happens to be a recipe that kids, as well as adults, almost always enjoy — you can choose whichever vegetables you like best. You can also modify the recipe and use quinoa instead of rice if you feel like mixing things up a bit, and feel free to adjust the soy sauce and sesame oil to your liking.

Vegetable Fried Rice
Serves 4-6

3 tablespoons olive oil
4 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and minced
½ cup scallions
5 cups assorted vegetables, washed and chopped, herbs
1 cup frozen baby peas
5 cups cold cooked rice
2 teaspoons sesame oil
5 eggs, lightly beaten
¼ cup soy sauce
Salt and pepper

1. In a large heavy bottomed skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger; cook for 30 seconds. 

2. Add all of the vegetables and cook for about 5 minutes, until done but still a little crisp. Add the peas, rice and sesame oil, and stir to combine. 

3. When the rice is hot, add eggs and soy sauce, cooking until the eggs are dry. 

4. Season with salt and pepper.

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 07/18/16 at 06:54 PM • Permalink

Blueberry Chicken Salad With Corn And Feta

I am happily a pescetarian. The times are rare that I regret my decision to eschew meat. But leave it to Guido’s to make me rethink it. This recipe, adapted from The Food Network by Guido’s own dietitian Rachel Alves, combines grilled chicken breast with corn and feta (and blueberries!), a summery mix that was a winner among customers lucky enough to be in the store when Rachel was offering samples.  —Lisa Green

Blueberry Chicken Salad with Corn and Feta
Serves: 12

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tbs. Herbes de Provence

For the Dressing:
2 tbs. mayonnaise
4 tbs. light sour cream
2 tbs. low-fat Greek yogurt
1/8 – 1/4 c. low-fat milk
Zest and juice of one lemon
1 tsp. maple syrup
3 tbs. fresh dill, minced
2 ears fresh corn on the cob
3 celery stalks, finely diced
1 large shallot or 1 small red onion, finely diced
1 1/2 c. blueberries
1/2 c. crumbled feta

For Chicken
Light a gas or charcoal grill until hot. Drizzle olive oil over chicken breast and season with salt, pepper and Herbes de Provence. Grill chicken about 7-8 minutes per side (depending on size). When done, remove to a platter, cover loosely with foil and let rest and cool while you make the rest of the salad.

Make Dressing
In a medium bowl, whisk together all of the ingredients and taste for enough salt and sweetness. Add enough milk to reach preferred consistency.

For the Salad
With a very sharp knife, shave kernels off each corn cob and in a large bowl, combine them with the celery, shallot or onion.

When chicken is cool enough to handle (after about 10 minutes or so), dice it into bite-sized pieces and place into the bowl with the celery, onion and corn. Stir to combine. Pour some of the dressing over the ingredients and toss gently to coat. Don’t over dress; it should be light!

Add the blueberries and feta and toss gently. Season with salt and pepper as needed.

For more of Guido’s recipes — in all categories — check the website here.

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Posted by Lisa Green on 07/11/16 at 01:07 PM • Permalink

Recipe: Asparagus and Shiitake Summer Rolls

One of our favorite events every summer is The Sylvia Center’s Farm-to-Table dinner, hosted by Great Performances in the fields of Katchkie Farm in Kinderhook, N.Y. The mission of The Sylvia Center is to inspire young people and their families to eat well through hands-on learning experiences on the farm and in the kitchen. Julie Cerny, farm education director and garden manager at The Sylvia Center, offers us recipes the teenagers are learning to make.

The possibilities for summer roll fillings are endless, but this is one of our favorites. Sweet, spicy and salty flavors combine to create an addictive appetizer that also is fun to make. Working with the rice paper rounds takes some finesse at first, but stick with it, and you’ll have a very delicious and very attractive dish to share. We encourage experimenting with different vegetable combinations, too. Let what’s ready in your garden be your guide!

Asparagus and Shiitake Summer Rolls
Yields 10 rolls

3 tablespoons finely chopped onion
1 small garlic clove, minced

3/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
3 tablespoons water

1 tablespoon creamy peanut butter

1 tablespoon hoisin sauce

1 teaspoon tomato paste

3/4 teaspoon sugar

4 ounces bean thread or rice noodles (cellophane noodles)

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1/2 pound shiitakes, remove stems and slice remaining portion

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 large sweet potato, steamed and cut into batons

1 pound asparagus, trimmed, steamed and halved lengthwise
(12) 8-inch rice-paper rounds, plus additional in case some tear

1. Cook onion, garlic and red pepper flakes in oil in a small heavy saucepan over moderate heat, stirring until pale golden, about 4 minutes. Whisk in remaining sauce ingredients. Simmer, whisking, for 1 minute, and then cool.

2. Cover noodles with boiling-hot water and soak 15 minutes, then drain well in a sieve. Pat dry between paper towels and toss with vinegar and salt to taste.

3. Heat vegetable oil in sauté pan. Add shiitakes and soy sauce. Cook for 2-3 minutes. Transfer to bowl.


4. Put a double thickness of paper towel on a work surface and fill a shallow baking pan with warm water. Soak 1 rice-paper round (make sure there are no holes) in warm water until pliable, 30 seconds to 1 minute, then transfer to paper towels.

5. Top rice paper round with even parts noodles, sweet potato, asparagus and shiitakes. Then fold in sides and continue rolling. Transfer summer roll to a plate and cover with dampened paper towels.

6. Continue until all of the rice wrappers have been used. Serve rolls halved on the diagonal.

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 07/05/16 at 10:47 PM • Permalink

Recipe: White Chocolate Souffle With Blueberry Whiskey Compote

This week we are happy to announce we are being joined by new recipe contributor Audrey Leary, who herself just welcomed her first child a few days ago. Fortunately, the Blackberry River Baking Company co-owner (along with her husband) and French Culinary Institute-trained pastry chef delivered this recipe before she did her baby.

My wedding anniversary is the day after my birthday, so we’ll usually go out to eat one night and I’ll make us something fancy the next. This year we had a fabulous dinner at Arethusa al Tavolo for my birthday and the following evening I made us duck for dinner and this for dessert. I’m a big white chocolate fan, and I always love the drama (and surprising ease) of a soufflé. Blueberries are starting to come in locally, and we have a great Berkshire Mountain Distillers whiskey that’s way too good to cook with, but for a special occasion, so good. The whiskey brings out the sweetness in the blueberries and the soufflé is just subtle enough to really let the compote shine.

You can also make the base of the soufflés ahead of time and then bake them off just before serving for a show-stopping dinner party ender.





White Chocolate Soufflé with Blueberry Whiskey Compote
(Recipe adapted from epicurean.com)
Makes 4 large or 6-8 medium soufflés

3 ounces white chocolate, chopped
4 eggs, separated
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
6 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 pint blueberries
1/2 cup sugar
1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste (or one vanilla bean)
About 1/2 cup of whiskey

For the soufflé:
Preheat the oven to 400°F. Butter 4 individual soufflé dishes, about 8 ounces each. Lightly dust the bottom and sides of the dishes with sugar. Melt the chocolate over barely simmering water; set aside to cool.

In a large bowl, beat the egg whites until foamy. Add the salt and cream of tartar, and beat until soft peaks form. Gradually add 2 tablespoons of the sugar, beating until stiff, glossy peaks form. In a medium bowl, beat the egg yolks until thick and pale in color. Beat in the remaining 4 tablespoons sugar. Stir in the vanilla and the melted chocolate. Fold one-fourth of the beaten egg whites into the chocolate mixture to lighten it; fold this mixture into the remaining egg whites.

Spoon the soufflé mixture into the prepared dishes. Bake for 10-12 minutes or until set and golden brown; if in doubt, give them an extra minute or two.

For the blueberry compote:
Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan and simmer on low heat until the bite has gone out of the whiskey and the sugar has dissolved; use a wooden spoon to stir and mash the blueberries. Use a spoon to make an indentation in the soufflés and pour in the compote. Enjoy!

 

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Posted by Lisa Green on 06/28/16 at 03:29 PM • Permalink

Recipe: Orzo Salad

One of our favorite events every summer is The Sylvia Center’s Farm-to-Table dinner, hosted by Great Performances in the fields of Katchkie Farm in Kinderhook, N.Y. The mission of The Sylvia Center is to inspire young people and their families to eat well through hands-on learning experiences on the farm and in the kitchen. Julie Cerny, farm education director and garden manager at The Sylvia Center, offers us recipes the teenagers are learning to make.

Summer is here, and our favorite summer veggies like tomatoes and peppers are making their way from seed to plate. But they aren’t on our plates, just yet anyways. Until they are, take another look at the lingering abundance of spring. This easy, delicious recipe makes use of the last harvests of spring veggies, while being a perfect dish for a hot summer day.

Orzo Salad

Serves 4-6

1 cup orzo
1 bunch of asparagus, cut into 1/2-inch segments
1 head broccoli
1 cup peas, freshly shelled or frozen
1 garlic clove, crushed to a paste with 2 big pinches of salt
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 bunch scallions, finely chopped
2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped
juice of one lemon

1. Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring to a boil. You are going to use some of this water over the orzo and the rest to blanch the peas, broccoli and asparagus.

2. Put the orzo in a medium bowl, add boiling water to the surface of the grains and let it stand for about 15 minutes, just until tender. Drain and press out any remaining water and toss with a couple pinches of salt. Set aside.

3. Return the saucepan to the heat and bring the remainder of the water back up to a boil. Salt the water and cook the broccoli, asparagus and peas for just about 20 seconds, just long enough for them to brighten up and lose a bit of their bite. Drain, run under colder water to stop the cooking, and add to the orzo.

4. For the dressing, whisk the garlic, lemon juice, and olive oil together and season with more salt if needed.

5. To the orzo, broccoli, asparagus, and peas add half the scallions. Toss with a big splash of the dressing. Taste and add more dressing if needed. Adjust the seasoning as well at this point. Garnish with the remaining scallions, the chopped egg and serve.

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Posted by Lisa Green on 06/20/16 at 04:22 PM • Permalink