Rural Intelligence: The Online Magazine for Eastern New York, Western Connecticut and the Southern Berkshires
Friday, September 04, 2015
 
Search Archives:
Newsletters Signup
Close it
Get The New App!


Newsletters Signup
Close it

RI Archives: Food

View past Recipe articles.

View all past Food articles.


RI on Facebook    RI on Instagram       

Haven Cafe & Bakery

Baba Louie's

52 Main

Olde Hudson

Red Devon

Chez Nous Bistro

Nejaime's Wine Cellars

Guido's Marketplace

Bimi cheese shop

Chatham Wine & Liquor

Recipe: Spicy Summer Squash Soup

Twice a month, Berkshire County native Alana Chernila, mother of two, and author of the cookbook, The Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying & Start Making (Clarkson Potter), contributes a thoughtful and heartfelt essay/recipe created exclusively for Rural Intelligence readers. Her first cookbook has achieved top-seller status, and Chernila has a new one in the works, titled “The Homemade Kitchen,” due out this year.

The fog arrived this morning, just in time for the first day of school. I swear it does this every year, and every year I send Joey and the girls off to a new unknown, and they swim through the pea soup fog to get to the van. They wave to me and I scoot them away, eager to get back to work and to my newly quiet house, but also because I don’t want to get lost in the fog myself. I don’t want to get stuck in the moment, think about the time that’s passed. At least, not while they’re trying to get out the door. Everyone’s a little tired and dragging — we lived summer to the fullest until the very last moment last night.

But this fog always brings in the season for me. I remember waiting for the bus on Lake Buel Road in Great Barrington in the very same pea soup, nervous for seventh grade (far more so than Sadie seems to be this year). I remember the feeling of the cold cloudiness burning off to the heat that characterizes this summer that is not quite summer. The routine and rituals of the fall have already started, but it’s hot enough to swim after school if life’s hectic schedule allows. The bugs are loud, the air is thick and bright, and we live in the world in between the seasons.

And oh the produce! This is the best time of year to eat. There is so much food, so many amazing vegetables. But unlike the still heat of August, this heat eases through the day, inspires sweaters by 7, so miraculously, wonderfully, it’s an excellent time to cook. Gone are the salads and grill-only meals. Now we make roast chicken and maybe even a celebratory first week of school lasagna. Now we make soup, the best food for transitions.

This is a great one for right now. It’s mostly an Alice Waters recipe, and I shift the spice and the thickness as my mood and ingredients dictate. Lately I’ve been using fresh turmeric, which I’m now finding in all the grocery stores. It adds a brightness that I just don’t get with dried.

Spicy Summer Squash Soup with Yogurt and Mint
(adapted from Alice Waters’ The Art of Simple Food)
Serves 8

1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon olive oil
1 large onion, sliced fine
1/4 teaspoon saffron threads
1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds
1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon dried turmeric, or 1 teaspoon fresh grated turmeric
1 teaspoon sweet paprika
2 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
5 to 6 medium green or yellow summer squash, cut into 1/2-inch slices
Salt
6 cups of stock, water, or some combination of the two
1/4 cup mint leaves, cut into ribbons
1 cup plain yogurt
Lime wedges, for serving

1. Heat 1/4 cup of the olive oil in a large, heavy bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the onion and spices and cook, stirring often, until the onion is soft, about 10 minutes.

2. Add the garlic, summer squash, and a sprinkle of salt. Cook for another few minutes, then add the stock or water. Raise the heat to medium high, cover the pot, and bring to a low boil. Reduce the heat to medium low and cook, covered, until the squash is tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

3. While the soup cooks, make the yogurt. Pound the mint with a little salt in a mortar and pestle (or in a bowl with the back of a wooden spoon). Add the remaining tablespoon of olive oil, continuing to pound the mint into a paste. Then stir in the yogurt, taste, and add salt if necessary.

4. Let the soup cool for a few minutes — then blend in an upright blender (carefully) or with an immersion blender. Taste, and adjust salt if necessary. Serve with a dollop of yogurt, and lime wedges on the side.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Amy Krzanik on 08/31/15 at 11:37 AM • Permalink

Recipe: August Corn Soup

Anyone who’s been to the Cross Roads Food Shop in Hillsdale knows the deeply satisfying pleasure of chef/owner David Wurth’s seasonally inspired cooking. So we asked him if he could supply us with one of his recipes this week, and he not only created one just for Rural Intelligence, he indulged me and made corn the centerpiece of it, because I may have mentioned I love corn soup. When he made the recipe in his kitchen, all of the ingredients except the oil and wine were from Columbia County farms, and it shouldn’t be hard to replicate that wherever you are in the Rural Intelligence area.

“It makes a healthy pot of soup, perfect for a big family or a backyard picnic,” Wurth says. “It can also be packed into quarts and given as a nice gift or frozen and saved for a cold autumn night.”

Not that I’m waiting for that cold autumn night, but…

—Lisa Green

August Corn Soup
Servings: About 12 big bowls

1/4 cup canola oil
1 yellow onion, diced
1 leek, diced
2 cloves garlic, chopped fine
2 tbsp. sage, chopped fine
1 small green cabbage, cut in half through the core, core removed, then cut into half-inch pieces
1 cup white wine
6 cobs of corn, shucked
4 quarts water
8 small new potatoes

1. Pour the oil into a large stainless steel pot, over a low flame sweat the onions, leek and garlic, covered, until soft—about 10 minutes.

2. Add the sage and cabbage and cook, covered, stirring occasionally another 10 minutes. Add the wine and, covered, cook 5 minutes.

3. While the soup sweats, remove the kernels of corn from the cobs, cutting them off with a sharp knife into a bowl. Once the corn has been removed from the cobs, scrape the corn liquid off the cobs and over the kernels with the back of the knife. Break the cobs in half.

4. Add the corn to the pot, cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat. Soup should simmer.

5. Wash the potatoes and cut into half-inch pieces and add them to the soup. Simmer, covered, for 40 minutes.

6. Let cool 15 minutes. Lift the hot cobs from the soup, carefully scraping off any soup bits from them and then discard.

7. In a food processor or blender, puree 3 cups of soup and then return the puree to the pot.

8. Season to taste. Reheat and garnish with a teaspoon of soft butter and fresh sage.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Lisa Green on 08/22/15 at 03:29 PM • Permalink

Recipe: Zhoug

Twice a month, Berkshire County native Alana Chernila, mother of two, and author of the cookbook, The Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying & Start Making (Clarkson Potter), contributes a thoughtful and heartfelt essay/recipe created exclusively for Rural Intelligence readers. Her first cookbook has achieved top-seller status, and Chernila has a new one in the works, titled “The Homemade Kitchen,” due out this year.

It’s time we really talk about zhoug, because every time it comes up in conversation (nearly daily), I try to reconstruct the recipe from memory. It’s that kind of condiment.

Zhoug is a pesto/ chimichurri/ spicy pepper relish/ everything I like about a condiment. It’s smellier and hotter and more living-on-the-edge than pesto, because it zings and pops and burns. I’ve been told its origins are Yemeni, but it’s popular in Israel and surrounding areas. I came to it, like I (and many Americans) came to many delicious recipes from that region, through Ottolenghi’s book Jerusalem. It was falafel night in my kitchen, and I was in search of new and exciting toppings.

Boy did I find one.

The recipe that follows is a hybrid between Ottolenghi’s and all the varied circumstances and available ingredients I’ve had in my kitchen when I’ve made it. It’s the kind of thing you blend and taste, blend and taste, and so it’s hard to trace the exact quantities without just instructing you to do the same. When it comes to the chiles, my favorite is roasted Hatch green chiles, which we order once a year from New Mexico and freeze. But canned will do just fine, and in the absence of Hatch chiles I’ve used all fresh jalapenos or any other hot pepper languishing on my counter, and again, well — blend and taste. 

And how do we use it? Of course we started with falafel. But it turns out to be outstanding on fried chicken, grilled meat, grilled vegetables, or smeared on flatbread. I’d say it’s pretty much fantastic on anything right now in this hot and spicy moment of August, when food is so good just on its own that the right condiment will make eating downright transcendent.

And with that, let’s make some zhoug.

Zhoug
Makes about 2 cups

1 large bunch flat-leaf parsley (stems and leaves), roughly chopped
About 25 mint leaves
1 small bunch cilantro (stems and leaves), roughly chopped
4 hot green chiles, roasted and roughly chopped
1-2 fresh hot peppers, seeded and chopped
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon cardamom
½ teaspoon cloves
1 teaspoon sugar
½ teaspoon salt
3 cloves garlic, crushed
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons water
Juice of 1 lime

Combine all ingredients in a large food processor and blend until you have a rough, uniform mixture. Taste and blend, taste and blend. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Lisa Green on 08/17/15 at 10:57 AM • Permalink

Recipe: Cornbread Panzanella Salad

This week’s recipe is from Berkshire-based duo The Butcher & The Baker. The Butcher is Jake, a nose-to-tail butcher/artist, who loves to cook and grew up in the woody hills of Western Massachusetts where his passion for local, fresh food was first instilled in him. The Baker is Silka, a designer/crafter who loves to bake and grew up in rural Western New York where her parents are candlestick makers. Together they spend most of their time talking about, shopping for, making, and eating food. By sourcing locally and sustainably, and spending time with the producers of their food, they’ve learned that every meal tells a story.

Few things hit the spot like a great salad on a hot August day. One of our favorite summer salads has already been perfected by not one, but two chefs in Great Barrington — Daire Rooney of the Mezze Restaurant Group and Steve Browning at Prairie Whale. They have different approaches to the dish, but our reaction is always the same; when we see a panzanella salad on either of their menus, we just have to order it.

But sometimes you just want to stay in and make your own, right? Luckily, with panzanella, you can’t go wrong. Just grab a few fresh ingredients, throw ‘em together and you’ve got a bright and satisfying classic summer side dish.

This salad is simple, but also highly adaptable. Don’t like cucumbers? Leave them out. Have some beautiful sweet peppers? Toss them in. Whether you’re picnicking at Tanglewood, dropping by a summer potluck, or just feeling lazy, this salad promises to deliver.

Cornbread Panzanella Salad

4 generous cups of cornbread, cut into 1 inch cubes
2 lbs. heirloom tomatoes, chopped into 1-2 inch pieces
1 fresh tropea onion, minced or 1 shallot, peeled and minced
1 or 2 cucumbers, sliced and chopped
5 tablespoons olive oil
Sea salt (something flaky like Maldon is best)
Freshly ground pepper
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
4-5 oz. good mozzarella, chopped into ½-inch pieces
1/2 cup basil, roughly chopped

1. Lay the cornbread cubes out on a baking sheet and drizzle about 3 tablespoons of olive oil on top. Toss until the pieces are generally covered, and season lightly with salt and pepper. Bake in a 400° oven for 10 minutes, gently stirring once or twice, until toasted.

2. In a large serving bowl, mix the tomatoes, onions or shallots, cucumbers, vinegar, remaining olive oil, and cheese. Add cornbread cubes and mozzarella, some salt and pepper, and toss.

3. Let sit for 20 minutes or so, then serve.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Amy Krzanik on 08/10/15 at 10:08 AM • Permalink

Recipe: Violet Beauregarde’s Revenge

Twice a month, Berkshire County native Alana Chernila, mother of two, and author of the cookbook, The Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying & Start Making (Clarkson Potter), contributes a thoughtful and heartfelt essay/recipe created exclusively for Rural Intelligence readers. Her first cookbook has achieved top-seller status, and Chernila has a new one in the works, titled “The Homemade Kitchen,” due out this year.

Yesterday, my husband and I walked up Hurlburt Hill in Ashley Falls with a group of friends. It was a gorgeous day, full of breezes and sculptured clouds, and every so often we’d turn around to admire the view and try to identify the curves of mountain below us.

“That’s definitely Mount Everett. And beyond… that jagged one? I think that might be Monument.”

It looked like the whole world was at our backs. But really it was just a small part of the county. And we had walked much farther than we could see from that hill. But as we reached the bench that marks the state line where Massachusetts meets Connecticut, we’d done it. We’d walked the length of the entire county that week.

The idea began a few years ago with one long walk through our own neighborhood. What if we walked the roads we drive every day, changed our perspective, slowed down? What if we stayed in hotels, ate in restaurants, visited museums and old houses, and experienced being tourists in our own home?

It was quite a week. If you’d like to see what we saw, spend a little time here. You’ll see that although we walked nearly 80 miles over the course of the week, we weren’t roughing it at all. I walked with a little pack that held a swimsuit (it was a hot week!) and a nice dress to change into when we got to that night’s destination. We ate some amazing meals, and drank some equally wonderful cocktails. We had picnics in stunning gardens, and walked down roads more beautiful than I ever could have imagined. And the best part is that now that it’s over, I don’t have to leave and go home. I’m already here.

One of my favorite drinks of the week was a summery refresher at the new restaurant Eat on North. We had a fantastic meal there (duck tacos—yes, yes, YES), and it started with this beauty that I got to sip in one of their hundreds of gorgeous chairs. Many of the county’s restaurants have been celebrating the recent accolades of Berkshire Mountain Distillers’ Greylock Gin this summer (voted #1 craft gin in the country by the The New York Times!), and if you ask for that restaurants’ #summerofgreylock special, you will not be disappointed. Eat on North calls theirs “Violet Beauregarde’s Revenge,” and it’s as blue and delicious as the name implies.

Violet Beauregarde’s Revenge
(created by sommelier Dan Thomas of Eat on North in Pittsfield, Mass.)

Ingredients:
Handful fresh blueberries
Half a lemon
½ oz. simple syrup
2 oz. Berkshire Mountain Distillers’ Greylock Gin

Preparation:
Place blueberries and lemon half in cocktail shaker or mixing glass and add simple syrup. Muddle ingredients to release oils. Add gin and about 8 ice cubes and shake. Strain mixture into a chilled cocktail glass.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Amy Krzanik on 08/03/15 at 09:30 AM • Permalink

Recipe: Ice Cream Sandwiches

Madeline Delosh, a Columbia County resident, owns Mado Patisserie in Chatham, NY. A graduate of the French Culinary Institute, she worked with Jean-Georges Vongerichten and was the pastry chef at La Grenouille Restaurant. “I like to reach out to those who love baking and pastries,” Madeline says. With her monthly recipe contributions to Rural Intelligence, she is doing just that. (And it you want some of Madeline’s ready-made delicacies, her shop is open for the season, Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.)

“Now that we’re getting some real summer weather, I decided to make my favorite vanilla ice cream with chocolate wafers to make ice cream sandwiches,” says our pastry expert Madeline Delosh. And you can bet these are a whole lot better than the ones in the supermarket freezer.


Vanilla Ice Cream
2 cups milk
2 cups cream
200 grams (3/4 cup) sugar
8 egg yolks
1 vanilla bean

Put the milk, cream and half the sugar into a saucepan. Split the vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape the seeds into the pan along with the pod. Bring to a simmer. Remove from the heat, cover, and let the vanilla infuse.

Place a bowl large enough to hold the finished mixture over an ice bath. Bring the cream/milk back to a boil.

Whisk the yolks with the remaining sugar. Whisking constantly, slowly pour about half of the hot mixture into the yolks to temper them. Return to the saucepan and cook over low heat. Do not allow the custard to boil. Stir constantly for about five minutes until the custard thickens and coats the back of a spoon. Pour into the bowl set over the ice bath.

Strain the cooled custard into a container and refrigerate until cold. Pour the custard into an ice cream machine and freeze according to manufacturer’s instructions. Keep the ice cream in the freezer to harden

Chocolate Wafers
12 oz. all-purpose flour
3 oz. cocoa powder
10 oz. butter
7 oz. sugar (softened)
3/4 tsp. salt
2 egg yolks
1 tblsp. vanilla

Sift the flour and cocoa together into a bowl. Set aside. In a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar. Add the salt. Add the yolks and beat until light. Add the vanilla. On low speed beat in the flour/cocoa mixture. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least two hours or overnight .

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Roll the dough out on a floured surface to about 1/8” thick. Cut out 16 three-inch circles and place on a parchment lined sheet pan. You can wrap the rest of the dough and freeze it. Bake for about 15 minutes until crisp.

When the wafers are cool, put a scoop of ice cream on half the wafers. Place the other wafers on top and press down slightly to form sandwiches.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Amy Krzanik on 07/28/15 at 11:46 AM • Permalink

Recipe: Honey Hibiscus Iced Tea

Twice a month, Berkshire County native Alana Chernila, mother of two, and author of the cookbook, The Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying & Start Making (Clarkson Potter), contributes a thoughtful and heartfelt essay/recipe created exclusively for Rural Intelligence readers. Her first cookbook has achieved top-seller status, and Chernila has a new one in the works, titled “The Homemade Kitchen,” due out this year.

Oh, summer food.

It’s too hot to cook, and these days our eating reflects that. Even more, we seem to get out of the very habit of eating once the simultaneously crazy and relaxed schedule takes over.

Take tonight, for example. After opening my fridge and staring at it more for its cool air than its contents, I gave up on the possibility of dinner inspiration. In the end, dinner consisted of a loaf of sourdough bread, three ripe tomatoes and a bunch of basil upright in a jar. I cut the bread, sliced the tomatoes, and set the pepper grinder alongside of it on the counter.

“Dinner,” I announced to the empty kitchen (others deep in novels behind closed room doors, working on random art projects outside, or searching for the last raspberries in the garden) and left the dinner there to make itself.

I love summer food. But I might love summer drinks even more.

The rest of the year, I don’t think too hard about keeping the fridge stocked with drink choices. But these days if you come over to visit, I’m giving you a drink list as long as a restaurant menu. Fruity iced tea, black iced tea, cold brew coffee. How about some Kombucha? (Rose or mint/lemon balm?)

It’s more than just the need to drink something cold in this heat. I fill the fridge with jars of deep purple, light green and dark coffee-black, because there is nothing so pleasing to me as a well-timed beverage in the summer. I’m tempted to stop into every coffee shop and store for fruity iced tea, strange coconut/maple water concoctions, dark creamy iced coffee. But when I make them myself, I save money, I feel resourceful, and I get to tailor the blends exactly to my taste. It’s a small pleasure, but isn’t that what summer is all about?

This makes a sweet tea with just a little tang. If you prefer your tea less sweet, reduce the honey or leave it out altogether.

Honey Hibiscus Iced Tea
Makes 8 cups

3 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers
¼ cup packed fresh mint leaves
2 cups near-boiling water
¼ cup honey
6 cups cold water

Combine the hibiscus and mint in a large jar or container. Pour the hot water over the herbs, then stir in the honey. Top off with the cold water.

Cover the container, then refrigerate for 24 hours. Strain out the herbs and store in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Amy Krzanik on 07/20/15 at 11:00 AM • Permalink

Recipe: Northern Thai-style Pork Shoulder

This week’s recipe is from Berkshire-based duo The Butcher & The Baker. The Butcher is Jake, a nose-to-tail butcher/artist, who loves to cook and grew up in the woody hills of Western Massachusetts where his passion for local, fresh food was first instilled in him. The Baker is Silka, a designer/crafter who loves to bake and grew up in rural Western New York where her parents are candlestick makers. Together they spend most of their time talking about, shopping for, making, and eating food. By sourcing locally and sustainably, and spending time with the producers of their food, they’ve learned that every meal tells a story.

We’ve probably already mentioned that we’re on a tasty journey through the varied flavors of the Asian continent – because, well, it’s all we can talk about! And in the last couple weeks, we’ve really dug into Thai cuisine. There’s just something about the combination of spicy Thai peppers and cooling herbs that tastes so perfect on the almost tropical evenings we’ve been enduring this summer.

Our recent efforts have been ever-more rewarding, as we now have a Thai expert at our disposal — our brother, Will. Will is a natural builder and spent six months living in Thailand… but this summer he’s become our official taste-tester. When he says our kitchen smells like a Thai food market, we know we’ve hit a recipe on its head.

This month we wanted to tackle a dish that we tasted at Andy Ricker’s famous Pok Pok Thai restaurant in NYC. It’s a simple but authentic dish of thinly-sliced grilled pork shoulder, marinated in a paste of cilantro roots, garlic and soy sauce, served with greens and rice. It is a perfect summer dish, and except for some fish sauce, it calls for no unusual ingredients.

Northern Thai-style Pork Shoulder

For the pork:
1 lb. pork shoulder
4 cloves garlic
Roots from 1 bunch cilantro (if you can’t get some with the roots, use the greens instead)
1 tbsp whole black peppercorns
2 tbsp sugar
4 tbsp Shoyu soy sauce (or another light soy sauce)

Pound garlic, cilantro roots and peppercorns together in a mortar and pestle or mix ingredients in a food processor. Either way, you’re going for a paste.

Cut shoulder meat into 1/2-inch thick slices. Rub paste onto the meat and marinate for an hour.

Grill the meat over a medium heat for 4 minutes on each side.

For the dipping sauce:
2 tbsp minced garlic
1 tbsp red chili pepper flakes
3 tbsp fish sauce
3 tbsp lime juice
2 tsp sugar
4 tbsp cilantro, finely chopped

Mix all together in bowl and serve along side grilled meat. Serve meat and sauce with bibb lettuce leaves or bok choy leaves and rice.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Amy Krzanik on 07/13/15 at 03:04 PM • Permalink

Recipe: Zucchini And Summer Squash

Twice a month, Berkshire County native Alana Chernila, mother of two, and author of the cookbook, The Homemade Pantry: 101 Foods You Can Stop Buying & Start Making (Clarkson Potter), contributes a thoughtful and heartfelt essay/recipe created exclusively for Rural Intelligence readers. Her first cookbook has achieved top-seller status, and Chernila has a new one in the works, titled “The Homemade Kitchen,” due out this year.

Here we go. Welcome to zucchini season.

It starts out slowly, like most food seasons do. Your plant in the garden extends itself first into big clumsy flowers, then a few slender fruits that you pick with great anticipation, already imagining them grilled, slivered, fried—but most of all delicious. Maybe there’s a little basket of them at the market, and of all the vegetables that’s the one you choose, knowing that with that purchase, summer is finally here.

But then they come for real, and no matter the weather, it’s always raining summer squash. They might be the subtle yellows, the UFO-like pattypans, or the blink-your-eyes-and-they’ve-doubled-in-size classic green zucchinis. Things turn dire, and neighbors start dropping off paper bags full of overgrown zucchinis under the cover of night. They claim it’s because they were passing by your house on their way back from Tanglewood and they know how much you love zucchini, but you and I both know it’s because they didn’t want to give you the chance to say “No thank you! I’ve got enough zucchini already.”

Oh we’re not there yet. But it will come. It will come soon.

It’s best to get out ahead if it, to remember how you love to prepare it, and keep building up the love affair right now, when it’s easy. Later, you can grumble as you shred zucchini for freezer bags that hopefully someday you’ll dig out of the freezer in January, somehow wildly inspired to turn the zucchini-cicle into chocolate zucchini bread. But now, now! We blacken the skin on the grill and eat each spear with our fingers. We shred it fine and toss it with good olive oil and lots of lemon. But mostly over here, I’m already loving my all-purpose favorite summer squash method. This is how it goes:

I pull out my trusty (although, yes, terrifying) mandolin and I transform as many summer squash as I have into thin coins. I pour several glugs of olive oil into a hot skillet, and I toss those coins with herbs (basil, rosemary, winter savory—you really can’t go wrong) and garlic (or right now, garlic scapes, which go especially well), and I shuffle them until they’ve shrunk and turned golden in places, and I’m moved to eat them out of the pan. Then there’s salt and pepper and a shot of balsamic. And finally there’s a whole lot of grating the Parmesan right over the pan.

From there, you can eat it right there while you decide what to do with it. But the beauty of this method is that it becomes a perfect base for so many different directions. Add beaten egg and milk to cover the vegetables and cook it for an amazing frittata. Spread it on grilled or toasted bread for a crostini. Or boil a pound of pasta, and spread your summer squash gold on top. It’s so good any which way. And because it cooks down, and makes you want to eat it all, it’s the perfect recipe to carry you through zucchini season.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Amy Krzanik on 07/06/15 at 10:55 AM • Permalink

Recipe: Strawberry/Rhubarb Tart

Madeline Delosh, a Columbia County resident, owns Mado Patisserie in Chatham, NY. A graduate of the French Culinary Institute, she worked with Jean-Georges Vongerichten and was the pastry chef at La Grenouille Restaurant. “I like to reach out to those who love baking and pastries,” Madeline says. With her monthly recipe contributions to Rural Intelligence, she is doing just that. (And it you want some of Madeline’s ready-made delicacies, her shop is open for the season, Friday, Saturday & Sunday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.)

It’s still strawberry season, for which we have no complaints, and Madeline Delosh is helping us make the most of it with her sumptuous and beautiful Strawberry/Rhubarb Tart. “I like to serve it with buttermilk sorbet, which is refreshing, light and tangy,” she says. “However, if you don’t want to bother making it, vanilla ice cream will be just as delicious.”

Strawberry Rhubarb Tart

Tart Dough (makes enough for two eight-inch tart shells)
9 oz. all-purpose flour
5½ oz. butter
3½ oz. sugar
1 large egg
Pinch of salt

In the bowl of an electric mixer, cream the butter and sugar. Add the egg and mix until incorporated. Slowly add the flour. Continue mixing until the dough is smooth and holds together. Let the dough rest for at least one hour or overnight in the refrigerator before rolling.

Roll the dough out about 1/8” thick and line your tart pan or ring. Refrigerate. (You can freeze any leftover dough).

Streusel
4 tbsp. butter
½ cup sugar
½ cup flour
½ cup almonds, ground to the consistency of coarse corn meal

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Place all ingredients in the bowl of a mixer and mix until crumbly. The pieces should be about 1/4” in size. Spread out on the parchment and bake, turning occasionally until golden brown and crisp.

Rhubarb Filling
2 cups rhubarb, washed, peeled and cut into ½” cubes
½ cup sugar
1 cup water
½ cup orange juice
1 cup strawberries, cut into 1/4” pieces
2 tbsp. flour
1 tbsp. sugar

Bring the orange juice, water and sugar to a boil. Add the rhubarb and cook on medium heat for about three minutes, just until the rhubarb softens slightly but holds its shape. Do not overcook.

Transfer the rhubarb to a bowl. Stir in the strawberries and refrigerate until cool. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Sprinkle the flour and 1 tbsp sugar over the bottom of the tart shell. Drain the rhubarb-strawberry mix and spoon it into the tart shell. Bake for about 30 minutes, until the dough is golden brown. Sprinkle the streusel over the tart. Dust with confectioner’s sugar.

Buttermilk Sorbet
2 cups buttermilk
1 cup milk
3/4 cup sugar
Juice of one lemon

In a saucepan, simmer the milk and sugar until the sugar dissolves. Let the mixture cool. Add the buttermilk and lemon juice. Chill until thoroughly cold. Freeze in an ice-cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Enjoy this post? Share it with others.

Posted by Lisa Green on 06/28/15 at 09:06 PM • Permalink