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RI Archives: Parties

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Robin Hood Radio

Hudson Opera House

Berkshire Grown

Columbia Land Conservancy

Trade Secrets

Great Barrington Historical Society

RBC

Classical Tents

Parties & Openings


April 20 - G. Barrington
Michael Caines' Animalia

April 11 - Pittsfield
IS183 Versace Tchotchke Expo

April 11 - G. Barrington
Project Native Film Festival

Animalia Attracts At Hillman-Jackson Gallery

Amy Krzanik reports from Great Barrington. The Hillman-Jackson Gallery at Bard College at Simon’s Rock is a forward-thinking, eclectic gallery at an equally forward-thinking and eclectic school. The Gallery’s current exhibition, Animalia, featuring the most recent work by painter Michael Caines, opened with an artist’s talk and reception on Monday, April 20. Caines collaborated with designer Sean Naftel to hang the show, which features paintings of dogs, cats — including one with a mustache — and humans which “slyly reference 17th-century portraiture, historical landscapes and minimalist painting.” The “star” of the show is Georgeous – a portrait of a dog with George W. Bush’s eyes and mouth — positioned low to the ground and behind tiny velvet ropes as if it were the Mona Lisa. You can catch the exhibit, downstairs at the Daniel Arts Center, through Thursday, May 14. Above, Ariana Taylor, Michael Caines and Sean Naftel.


Simon’s Rock painting and drawing professor Jacob Fossum with husband Jackson Liscombe, a computer science professor at Simon’s Rock; Hillman-Jackson Gallery curator Margaret Cherin and photographer Gregory Cherin.


Designer John Mahoney and gallerist Ronald Wells; Art students Zoe Hu and Rebecca Cosenza.

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 04/21/15 at 10:29 AM • Permalink

IS183’s Gala: Versace, Tchotchkes, Mariachi And A Hibachi

Amy Krzanik reports from Pittsfield. To say that IS183 Art School of the Berkshires throws a great gala would be an understatement, as anyone who’s ever been to one can attest. This year’s big blowout, on Saturday, April 11, was no exception, as volunteers turned the Crowne Plaza Hotel into the Versace Tchotchke Expo with Mariachi + Hibachi. Donatella Versaces (yes, more than one) catwalked their way through the ballroom, taking in the larger-than-life mariachi men and hovering lightning clouds, and posing for selfies with giant owls and Matrushkas. Human tchotchkes and hibachi chefs bid on auction items that included tickets to the sold-out July 4th James Taylor concert at Tanglewood, overnight stays at area luxury hotels, private massages, wine tastings, theater tickets and, of course, artwork including handmade jewelry, leather goods, portrait sittings, personalized photography and ceramics classes and other creative offerings you won’t find anywhere else. Funds raised benefit IS183’s Learning Through Arts (LTA) program, which serves more than 1,250 Berkshire County public school students of all ages in more than 15 area schools through after-school and summer art programs. In photo above, Hope Sullivan, IS183’s executive director, and Nancy Fitzpatrick.


Six Depot’s Flavio Lichtenthal and Lisa Landry with Emily Shaw; Peter and Leigh Boyd.


Tom Haskins-Vaughan and Elissa Haskins-Vaughan; David Slick, Robin Seeley, Arthur Cape and Pat Whitehead.


Tom Werman, Jenny Fenig and Steven Fenig; Vicki Bonnington, wearing the amazing tchotchke dress she made, poses with a mariachi man.


Reg Millington, Z Steinhauer, IS183 Associate Program Director Lucie Castaldo, Christina Barbieri and Chas Quimby.


IS183 Marketing Associate Carrie Wright and Bill Wright; Nancy Fitzpatrick, Joseph Wheaton and Seth Nash.


Artist Janine Strong, Josh Needleman of Chocolate Springs Café, Yuki Cohen of Methuselah Bar and Lounge and Adrienne Rynes; Ty Jackson and Brenda Petell.


The evening’s DJ, Dave Leonard, and Maisie Rugen manned the “hibachi.”; Ashley Junod, Rob Weisberger and Jenna Lanphear.


Jess Fitzgerald and Ben Evans, the ceramics studio manager at IS183; Mariachi men partied with the crowd.


Joseph Wheaton’s projections made a stunning backdrop to the dance party.

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 04/12/15 at 12:58 PM • Permalink

Waste Not, Want Not With Project Native

Rachel Louchen reports from Great Barrington. The fifth annual Project Native Film Festival presented a full day of environmentally-themed cinema, and its opening night event both entertained and educated guests. On Saturday, April 11, attendees gathered on the stage of The Mahaiwe to enjoy a feast of culled food before a screening of Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story. The documentary dives into the subject of food waste and the culling process, which sorts food and then classifies whether it is usable in supermarkets. Food is often disposed of due to blemishes or being too ripe, resulting in 40 percent of products raised or grown in the US not being eaten. Local farms donated culled food for the evening — food in which Chef Michael Ballon of Castle Street Cafe had been challenged with sorting through to craft the menu. Guests enjoyed recycled vegetable pizza, stuffed red cabbage, crostini of raclette and other items, which demonstrated just how delicious the so-called “undesirable food” can be. Above, Project Native Education and Outreach Coordinator (and sole organizer of the film festival) Karen Lyness LeBlanc and Dana Wagner, manager of Hawthorne Valley Farm.


Chairman of Project Native’s board Erik Bruun with board member (and one of the evening’s speakers) Barry Shapiro; Andrew Grimaldi and Laura Carboneau drove from Winchester, New Hampshire to attend the event.


Filmmakers Grant Baldwin and Jen Rustemeyer; Laura Wolff and Karen Preuss of Hawthorne Valley Farm, which donated cheese, baguettes, vegetables and yogurt.


Co-owners of Native Habitat Restoration (and one of the evening’s sponsors) Jess Toro and Sari Hoy with Becky Ferguson


Richard Grausman, Susan Grausman, Marjorie Shapiro and Barry Shapiro; Martin Ping and Janene Ping from Hawthorne Valley Farm.


Christine Heaton and Danny O’Dell of Big Elm Brewery donated the beer; mother of the filmmaker Edie Restemeyer with Sally Harris and Fred Harris, owners of Saint James Place.


Lynne Kaplan of Great Barrington, volunteers Diane Saunders and Bob Rosen, and board member David Kaplan.

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Posted by Rachel Louchen on 04/11/15 at 10:52 PM • Permalink

Jim Shaw’s ‘Entertaining Doubts’ Opens at MASS MoCA

Amy Krzanik reports from North Adams. Wigs, a lamp in the shape of a nose, glowing sculpture under black lights, Dan Quayle (remember him?), Superman’s head on the body of a chicken — all of these items and more are featured in MASS MoCA’s newest exhibition, Jim Shaw: Entertaining Doubts. On Saturday, March 28, the Museum held an opening reception for the artist, who was celebrating his largest U.S. exhibition to date, one that includes a new work made especially for the show. The large-scale banner work, Not Since Superman Died, features the superhero as a mere mortal, possibly unable to escape calamity. The event doubled as a belated reception for Bibliothecaphilia, which opened at the Museum this past January. Shown above, the show’s curator, Denise Markonish, with the artist.


Larry Rosenthal with Lisa Rosenthal and Pamela Rosenthal; Henry and Solé, who is featured in Clayton Cubitt’s Hysterical Literature in the Museum’s Bibliothecaphilia exhibit.


Photographer Karl Mattson and artist Marisa LaGuardia; Artist Jena Priebe, whose The Secret Lives of Books is part of the Bibliothecaphilia exhibit, with Winston Rylee and Hannah Pivo, a visual arts intern at the Museum.


Beyang Shi, Brady Myers, artist Beth Beckman, writer Chris Robinson and Emily Fuhrman. all visiting from Brooklyn.


Ashley Lyon and Anne Currier; Manuela Mozo, Olaf Breuning and Makiko Aoki.


Sculptors Tim Walker and Samantha Pasapane and artist Matthew Wilson; Lauren Young, an art history graduate student at Williams College, and Allie Foradas, who curated Bibliothecaphilia.


Artist Jason Middlebrook, curator Denise Markonish, artist Mary Lum and the Museum’s director, Joseph Thompson.


The artist (far right), with his cousin, Craig Shaw Gardner and his wife Barbara Gardner; Four of the above-mentioned wigs.

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Posted by Amy Krzanik on 03/29/15 at 03:04 PM • Permalink

In Wine We Trust At Morrison Gallery

Rachel Louchen reports from Kent. In just five years, the Annual Spring Wine Tasting for Kent Land Trust has turned into “a new Kent tradition,” mused Kent Wine and Spirits owner Ira Smith. Close to 400 guests attended the fundraiser — the largest wine tasting in Litchfield County — on Saturday, March 28. More than 70 wineries from 25 regions of the country took part in the event, with some vendors driving from as far as two states over to represent their brands. The event was held in the beautiful Morrison Gallery, renowned for its contemporary art and sculpture, and guests mingled comfortably thanks to the modern structure with its soaring ceiling. All proceeds from the event benefit the Land Trust’s mission to preserve conservation properties, which, as the turnout indicated, is important to the town of Kent, as well as the surrounding areas. Above, Kent Land Trust Executive Director Connie Manes, board member and event chair Steve Vaughn and board member Laurie Voss.


Kent Land Trust Office Manager Gwynne Seufert and Ken Seufert; Donna Campbell and Bob Campbell of Woodbury.


Kent residents Jonathan Edelman and Stacey Haefele; Stephanie Weaver of Warren with Dale Horn of Goshen.


Peter and Erin Donohoe of Cornwall Bridge with Kent Wine & Spirits owner Ira Smith; Lynda Weber and Aline Marie, visiting from Sandy Hook.


Casey Cogut and Ellen Cogut with Bill Arnold, President of the Kent Land Trust Board of Directors.


Alina Hernandez and Rose Anne Thorn; Artists Tracy Collamore and Jessica Bartlet with John Bartlet.


New Kent residents Tom Knotek and Paul Hilepo; Sue and Pete Beerman.


Sarah Weitz and Sam Wunderl were visiting Kent for the weekend from NYC; Burt Visotzky and Ken Cooper of South Kent.


South Kent native Mark Owens, Melissa Cherniske, board member Darrell Cherniske and Bruce Whipple.

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Posted by Rachel Louchen on 03/29/15 at 11:29 AM • Permalink

Chapter 1: Hudson Children’s Book Festival Fundraiser

Lisa Green reports from Hudson. Authors, teachers and literacy lovers generated an enthusiastic buzz at the Hudson Children’s Book Festival fundraising cocktail party on Saturday, March 28 at Stair Galleries. With more than 70 percent of the students in the Hudson Community School District living below the poverty line, one of the goals of the Children’s Book Festival Scholarship Fund, founded by Chris Jones and Susan Simon, is to provide hundreds of Hudson students the money to buy a book at the Festival. The fund also awards several high school seniors scholarship money to buy books at college. Students passed hors d’oeuvres and read passages from a book whose National Book Award-winning author will be attending the festival. Torrey Maldonado, a “Top 10 Latino Author” and author of the acclaimed novel “Secret Saturdays,” described what sets the Hudson Children’s Book Festival (the largest children’s book festival in New York State) apart from others. “You see love there, ” he said. “Kids are allowed to express their love for books. Your donation is about voice and choice.” Above, Torrey Maldonado and Jennifer Clark, Festival co-director. This year’s Festival will be May 2.

Janet Schnitzer, past president of the Hudson Area Association Library and Vicki Kosovac, president of the Friends of the Hudson Area Library; Emily Gripple, visiting from Chicago and Paige Darrah, a freelance writer for Main Street Magazine.


Susan Simon, cookbook author and scholarship fund co-founder, Carolyn West and Lisa Dolan, Festival co-director.


Barbara Mojica and Victor Mojica, both children’s book authors from Craryville; Katrina Wilber, who teaches physical education for the Hype Park Central High School, and Andy Millar, a third grade teacher in the Hudson School District.

Atia Begh, Ramisa Tasnim and Brittany Varriale, students from Hudson High, read passages aloud from “Brown Girl Dreaming,” whose award-winning author, Jacqueline Woodson, will appear at the Festival.


Ian MacCormack, associate principal at Hudson’s intermediate school, Don MacCormack of the Bank of Greene County, and writer Jonathan Lerner; Ellen Huemmer, a teacher, and Diane Kreig, a retired reading teacher.


Owen Davidson, Chris Jones, scholarship fund co-founder, and Mark Prezorski, landscape curator at The Olana Partnership.


A trio of teachers: Jennifer Merwin-Domkoski, Tani Quinion and Amie Malin; Jennifer Clark, Mark Brenneman, Montgomery C. Smith Intermediate School principal, Maria Suttmeier, superintendant of the Hudson City School District, Liz Novine, guidance counselor, and Ian MacCormack.

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Posted by Lisa Green on 03/29/15 at 10:05 AM • Permalink

A Saturday Evening for J.C. Leyendecker at The NRM

Rachel Louchen reports from Stockbridge. The arrival of spring brings change and, at Norman Rockwell Museum, it means “fresh new work” said Director Laurie Norton Moffatt, as she addressed the crowd at the opening reception for J.C. Leyendecker and The Saturday Evening Post on Saturday, March 21. The exciting exhibit is a tribute to the innovative illustrator, who captivated the country with his magazine covers, an astounding 400 for numerous general interest publications and 322 for The Saturday Evening Post (beating Rockwell by just one). On display until June 14, the exhibition offers a rare glimpse of every one of his Post covers, generously donated by NRM trustee William Hargreaves (shown above with his wife, Sandy). Rockwell and Leyendecker were good friends during their years as neighbors in New Rochelle, New York, their work had common themes, and Leyendecker was a huge influence on Rockwell. Now, museum guests are invited to compare their work as it hangs side by side.


President of the Museum’s Board of Trustees, Robert Horvath, with Deputy Director and Chief Curator Stephanie Plunkett; Pip Deely and Leigh Moffat.


Judy Cutler and Laurence Cutler, art historians and founders of the National Museum of American Illustration in Newport, Rhode Island, who gave an in-depth talk about Leyendecker’s career, shown here with Tim McCann at far left.


Stephanie Beling and Gloria Pixley of Lenox; Curatorial staffer Barbara Rundback with Jesse Kowalski, curator of exhibitions.


Just one of the covered walls displaying the complete set of Leyendecker’s 322 Post covers.


Made in the Berkshires co-founder Hilary Somers Deely with Michael Pulitzer, Jr., who sits on the NRM National Advisory committee; New NRM member Alison Ash from West Stockbridge with Margit Hotchkiss, deputy director for audience and business development.


David and Kristine Snyder with Alicia Antreasian and Clovis Madeiros of Boston.

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Posted by Rachel Louchen on 03/22/15 at 06:23 PM • Permalink

Gutsy Gals Make Films And Walk The Red Carpet

Lisa Green reports from Great Barrington. A red carpet event in our region? It’s happening frequently these days, and on Saturday, March 21, the carpet and backdrop were staged for the first-ever Gutsy Gals Inspire Me Film Awards at Bard College at Simon’s Rock. Presented in conjunction with the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers, the award honors women writers and directors of films, with the grand prize going to “Muffin Top: A Love Story,” a romantic comedy written and directed by Cathryn Michon, who plays the lead role of a woman learning to “love the skin you’re in.” The Berkshires’ own Karen Allen, Gutsy Gals founder Deborah Hutchison and its COO Christina Holbrook announced the 11 winners of the films, several of whom were in attendance. Following the screening, Cathryn Michon answered questions from the audience. “I just want to be a voice of encouragement to women making films,” she said. Above, Michon and Hutchison.


Jana Laiz, author and writer-in-residence at Herman Melville’s Arrowhead and Karen Allen, actor, director and owner of Karen Allen Fiber Arts in Great Barrington.


Cathryn Michon chats with RI reporter Nichole Dupont, who wrote the Rural Intelligence story on the film awards event; Gutsy gals on the red carpet.

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Posted by Lisa Green on 03/22/15 at 11:00 AM • Permalink